Joe Thompson

Joe Thompson (jjthomps@sfu.ca) is a PhD student in Psychology at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. His primary empirical interests are in adolescent and young adult skill development and maintenance. The work employs detailed records of Real Time Strategy video game play, allowing for large samples of natural performance from a variety of ages. The work has been fortunate to receive international media coverage. At a more theoretical level, Joe takes his work to elucidate the complexity of developmental processes more generally. This attitude motivates Joe’s interest in new methodologies that allow for a clearer picture of how natural forms of cognition develop. (Research Gate Link)

Papers

Thompson, J. J., McColeman, C. M., Stepanova, E. R., & Blair, M. R. (in press). Using Video Game Telemetry Data to Research Motor Chunking, Action Latencies, and Complex Cognitive‐Motor Skill Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science.

Thompson, J.J., Sameen, N., & Racine, T.P. (2016). Methodological Consequences of Weak Embodied Cognition and Shared Intentionality. New Ideas in Psychology, 43, 28-38.

Thompson JJ, Blair MR, Henrey AJ (2014) Over the Hill at 24: Persistent Age-Related Cognitive-Motor Decline in Reaction Times in an Ecologically Valid Video Game Task Begins in Early Adulthood. PLoS ONE 9(4): e94215. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094215

Racine, T. P., Wereha, T. J., Vasileva, O., Tafreshi, D., & Thompson, J. J. (2014). The evolution of joint attention: A review and analysis. In M. Pina & N. Gontier (Eds.), The evolution of social communication in primates: A multidisciplinary approach. New York: Springer.

Tafreshi, D., Thompson, J. J., & Racine, T.P. (2014). An analysis of the conceptual foundations of the infant preferential looking paradigm. Human Development, 57. 222-240.

Thompson J, Blair MR, Chen L, Henrey, AJ (2013). Video Game Telemetry as a Critical Tool in the Study of Complex Skill Learning. PLoS ONE 8(9): e75129. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075129

Thompson, J., Sameen, N., Bibok, M., & Racine, T. (2013). Agnosticism gone awry: Why developmental robotics must commit to an understanding of embodiment and shared intentionality. New Ideas In Psychology, 31(3). 184-193.

Sameen, N., Thompson, J., & Carpendale, J. (2013). Commentary on Schilbach et al.  “Toward a second-person neuroscience”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36(4). p. 437.

Jennings, R., & Thompson, J. (2012). The Biological Centrality of Talk. In A. Kravchenko (Ed.), Cognitive Dynamics in Linguistic Interactions (pp. 33-63): Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Jennings, R., & Thompson, J. (2012). The biology of language and the epigenesis of recursive embedding. Interaction Studies, 13(1), 80-102.

Thompson, J.J., Sameen, N., & Racine, T.P. (In Press). Methodological Advantages of Strong and Weak Renditions of Embodied Cognition and Shared Intentionality. New Ideas in Psychology.

 

Conferences

Thompson, J, Blair, MB, & Henrey, AJ. Analysis of telemetry data suggests cognitive motor decline at 24 years. Poster at Canadian Psychological Association annual conference, Vancouver, 2014.

Thompson, J, Sameen, N, & Racine, TP. Methodological advantages of strong and weak renditions of embodied cognition and shared intentionality. Presented at Canadian Psychological Association annual conference, Vancouver, 2014.

Blair, MB, Thompson, J, Chen, L & Henrey, AJ. Telemetric video game data cast doubt on the presumption that skill development is an orderly process. Poster at Canadian Psychological Association annual conference, Vancouver, 2014.

Thompson, J, & Blair, MB (2014). Basic Science With Clear Applications: Video-game Telemetry Data Enables a New Drosophilia for the Cognitive Sciences. Presented at Games User Research workshop at the 2014 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Thompson, J, Blair, MB, & Henrey, AJ. Analysis of telemetry data suggests cognitive motor decline at 24 years. Poster at Canadian Psychological Association annual conference, Vancouver, 2014.

Blair, MB, Thompson, J, Chen, L, & Henrey, AJ (2014). Telemetry data and machine learning techniques allow for a new methodology in the study of expertise, and cast doubt on an old one. Poster at Association for Psychological Science annual conference, San Francisco.

Thompson, J, Blair, L, & Henrey, AJ (2014). Age-related slowing on a real world task after 24: results from the analysis of video game telemetry data. Poster at Association for Psychological Science annual conference, San Francisco.

Tafreshi, D &  Thompson, J (2014). An analysis of the conceptual foundations of the infant preferential looking paradigm. Presented at Canadian Psychological Association annual conference, Vancouver, 2014.

Thompson, J. Developmental predictions from systems theory (2013). Jean Piaget Society, Chicago, IL.

Thompson, J., Blair, M., Chen, L, & Henrey, A.J. (2013). Video game telemetry contributes to the study of complex skill learning. Northwest Cognition and Memory, Vancouver, BC.

Sameen, N., & Thompson, J. (2012). The role of embodied robots in the study of social cognition. 42nd Annual Meeting of the Jean Piaget Society, Toronto, Canada.

Thompson, J., Racine, T. & Sameen, N. (2012). The role of embodied robots in the study of social cognition. 42nd Annual Meeting of the Jean Piaget Society, Toronto, Canada.

Thompson, J. (2010, October). The Empirical Investigation of Mental Representations and their Composition. 62nd Annual Northwest Philosophy Conference, Willamette University.

Jennings, R., & Thompson, J. (2010, September). The Epigenesis of Recursive Embeddings. Language as Social Coordination: An Evolutionary Perspective, University of Warsaw.

Jennings, R., & Thompson, J. (2009, October). Biology and Linguistics: Whence Hierarchy?  Northwest Philosophy Conference Pacific University.

Jennings, R., & Thompson, J. (2009, October). Biology and Linguistics: Whence Hierarchy. Western Canadian Philosophical Association Conference University of Regina.

 

Letters to editor

Tafreshi, D., Thompson, J.J., & Racine, T.P. (2014). The Conceptual-Empirical Distinction: Optimistic about the Study of Infant Cognition. Human Development, 57. 250–258.

 

Coordinated Symposia

Developmental predictions from systems theory (Organizer). Jean Piaget Society, Chicago, IL. June, 2013.

 

Media Coverage

https://cslabsfu.wordpress.com/press-coverage/

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